The Ebb and Flow of Tides

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Planescape: Torment was and is one of my favorite games and also happens to feature one of my favorite universes. I’ve read the novelized version of the companion to the game and it is as much a fun and darkly intriguing mystery as the game itself was and is. Therefore, Torment: Tides of Numenera has been on my radar for quite some time and is truly something that I know I can and will enjoy playing through. This particular blog post is my first for the month (and first in a little while after my short hiatus) as well as a preface to what will soon be my review and report for the game, seeing as it just released.

So far I just want to share some of my thoughts going into the game, as well as a few tidbits from what little I’ve personally played thus far. Mind you, I don’t want to spoil any key elements to the plot or anything so for the most part I’ll be doing my best to avoid that here and in the future. I’ve played literally less than an hour in-game and therefore I’m assuming I’ve yet to even brush the surface of any grand scheme in terms of plot within the Planescape universe this time around as well. For the most part this is just going to be my thoughts prior to booting the game up and my reaction to the fan service that actually led to this title being developed in the first place.

Lately my time has consisted of a few measly things- living and laughing with my loved ones, working, studying important and intricate information on occasion, binge-watching Luther for the sheer heck of it, and salivating over Tides of Numenera and the promise it brings with it. I have greatly enjoyed the sudden influx of semi-traditional role-playing games in the last few years, from Pillars of Eternity to Torment. While I do love the action-RPGs that we see littering the desolate gaming landscape nowadays as well, I can’t help but always miss the “good old days” of classical role-playing as well. And as such, I constantly return to titles like Fallout 2 and Planescape. Whether you’re a fan of the old vibes of the 1990’s or the Baldur’s Gate II vibes from the early 00’s, the last few years have been kind to you if you like tradition meets neo-RPG style adventures.

Although the story of Tides of Numenera seems to largely be a microcosm built within the expansive universe of Planescape lore, it boasts some familiar elements for those of you who’ve played the first game or even read the book(s). When you place a society a billion years into the future truly anything can happen and that is no more apparent then the moment you begin this game. I really enjoyed watching the trailers for the game in the build up to its release and one thing that struck me as the most impressive but also the most obvious was the duality of choice. Choices can have any number of outcomes and as gamers we know this better than most people. Seeing the branching topical storylines in the trailer for Numenera was as awe-inspiring as seeing some of the new and interesting zones I’ll surely be able to travel to later in my own adventure.

I understand that some people greatly prefer the action-RPG archetype to that of the wordy, text-loving Zork II-style classical role-playing genre, and I hardly blame you. Games like The Elder Scrolls (series) and Fallout 3 (or New Vegas and Fallout 4) have plenty of lore and extra side content to discover completely at your own behest. And yet the original titles such as Fallout and Baldur’s Gate and Planescape that offer oftentimes lengthy conversations that rival or surpass Mass Effect in their depth and design are so much better still. I love tense action and leveling up my characters, but something I surprisingly miss a lot in newer games is that break from the action and the ability to truly revel in revelations and deep pondering of philosophical and interesting content. Sure, games like Deus Ex: Mankind Divided handle some extremely relevant and important topics such as technological advancement versus mankind itself, and yet that game is still more a shooter than it will ever be a story.

The best elements of every story at some point must stem from the sheer fact that it is a story in the first place. And that is largely why Tides of Numenera strikes me as a much needed breath of fresh air. Ironically so, to some degree. It is very much old school in some ways but then again why fix what was never broken in the first place? Just because it features plenty of text and character driven choices in its own “craft your own adventure” style of set-up, Torment is no less exciting than the action-fueled adventures of Commander Shepard and the Normandy in its own ways. It is a realm and world-spanning adventure and a worthy continuation of the series as far as I can tell.I’m definitely looking forward to playing it more and more, even if it will be splitting time with my trilogy runthrough of Mass Effect in anticipation for Andromeda’s release.

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