Games I Didn’t Review in 2016: Titanfall 2

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I have played both Titanfall titles for what probably amounts to a decidedly ridiculous amount of time. I reviewed the first one a long while ago and enjoyed it profusely despite its connectivity issues and other flaws. The second one is very much the Modern Warfare 2 to Infinity Ward’s Modern Warfare 1 in that it steps up the game in almost every single way, adds much more content, increases the replayability tenfold, and then makes other tweaks and adjustments that you never even realized needed to be taken care of but now cannot function without. I guess it’s fitting that Respawn would be the company to produce such a gem, especially with their roots in Call of Duty’s past as well.

Titanfall 2 is without a doubt the greatest first-person shooter title I’ve yet to play on the current generation of consoles. And that’s truly saying something, because there have been some spectacular gems along the way these past few years. My reasons for this lofty accolade are many and yet they all tie in to some of the same facts and opinions as well. For example, one thing that Titanfall 2 does that few other games save for perhaps the Battlefield series have yet to match or come close to, is offer a stunning degree of customization in the multiplayer client. I’m constantly surprised- not just by the amount of camouflage or titan chassis and colors or items offered, but by the entirety of the package provided with the base game devoid of microtransactions in terms of what is already available to players through simple unlocks.

Granted, if you want to pay a dollar or five here and there, you can unlock neat special chassis and camo patterns and packs, but even at the base level without these minimal transactions there is so much available to players. Another thing that is surprisingly done quite well is the leveling and unlocks system. In the first game there didn’t seem to be too much available upon leveling up one of fifty times or making it through another generation and essentially hitting the “prestige” level and restarting. In Titanfall 2 this has been remedied by the addition of golden tickets of sorts that are called merits. Instead of hitting a specific experience cap, you gain x amount of merits per level, per weapon, per perk/feat, per titan, etc etc. All of these combine in your after action review of a match and go towards your overall level and unlocks- of which there are many, many, many things to unlock and discover (whether that be weapons, attachments, camouflages, perks/feats, etc).

Moving away from the multiplayer content for a moment, let’s discuss the equally interesting and exciting single player mode. Yes- this Titanfall title actually offers one and doesn’t skimp by adding in radio bursts of exposition and story to campaign labeled multiplayer matches. I really enjoyed fleshing out some of the characters from the first Titanfall in a standalone story of Titanfall 2’s own creation. The single player does a good job of gradually introducing mechanics and attributes of the multiplayer content through loadouts for titans and weapon pickups for pilots- essentially operating as an interactive and fully immersive tutorial. The story is in some ways cliche for the shooter environment and yet in many others it is truly interesting for all the ways it explores the relationship between man and machine. I won’t ruin any of the spectacular moments the short campaign offers, but I will say it boasts impressive mechanics, some original ideas here and there, and plenty of tight shooting, platforming, and even interesting Singularity/Portal-esque mechanics.

I came into Titanfall 2 wondering how they were going to improve upon the interesting foundation laid by the original title and I came out of my first few hours with the game totally blown away. It’s no mere matter of adding a single player campaign or perhaps adding a few additional titan classes to the mix. Titanfall 2 has completely changed a lot of things around without losing the allure of the original experience or sacrificing anything that couldn’t be built newer or better. The community is thriving so far and the developers are constantly providing reasons for us to play the game- from daily rewards and bonuses to dropping free map packs and additional content every few months like they did with the original game as well. In an industry dominated by microtransactions and paid content, Respawn and Titanfall 2 have made an excellent environment and case for providing what the players want free of major additional charges. Yes, even they aren’t perfect, but it’s much better than $20 a pop for Call of Duty maps and constant barrages of new weapons to pay to win with.

I don’t even think my glowing words can necessarily do the game itself the justice it deserves, but I’ll let the near 90% in average reviews and ratings do the talking for me. If I had to gauge the game appropriately on my own scale, I’d probably give it a 9.5/10 and that’s quite rare for me considering most titles I review typically fall within the 7.5-8.5 range on the spectrum. I’ve honestly enjoyed every single element of the game, even with the few flaws it has, and even considering the fact that most multiplayer game modes operate virtually the same with slight modifications. That’s truly a testament to how exciting and exhilarating the overall experience is.

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